No Room for Regret – Reviews

Janeen, I finished reading at about midnight last night. Double congratulations. It’s an amazingly well researched and well written book. I’d recommend all our UTAS cohort read it. (not to mention anyone else who is interested in history, adventure and romance). You’ve graphically shown the conditions that convicts lived in on the hulks, transport ships, and the early days of Tasmania, The facts have been so entwined into the fictional story that I felt every sentence spoken and every smallest action actually happened (as it well might have). I was enthralled through every page and couldn’t put the book down till finished. Congratulations again.

(Tricia)

I loved the book, Janeen. Can’t wait to read the next one.

(Linda Lowe)

Just finished the book. Hurry up and write the next one.

(Leisel)

I just finished the book. Really loved it. Poor Teddy.

(Kellie)

Finished your book. Feel very privileged to have been part of your journey. Loved the accurate references in the novel. So well put together can’t wait for the next instalment

(Max Porter)

Excellent courses in family history are now being provided at many levels and it is good to see how these are bringing forth some wonderful creativity in those who have made the effort to use their newly-won academic qualifications to breathe life into their research.

No Room for Regret is a just-published novel about the life and times of First Fleeter James Bryan Cullen, his wife Elizabeth Bartlett and their children. The author, Janeen Ann O’Connell, is a Cullen descendant who has used her studies to produce a lively tale of the early days of settlement along the Derwent.

The focus of this work, the first in a planned trilogy on the ‘Cullen-Bartlett Dynasty’, is predominantly on the two men who arrived together on the Indefatigable to Hobart Town in 1812.

James Blay and James Tedder are very different characters and yet their time in Newgate, on the prison hulk Retribution and on Indefatigable en route to Hobart Town in May 1812 drew them and later their children together in ways that would never have been foreseen. And overseeing them, as their employer during their convict time is another James, the benevolent patriarch Cullen himself, whose own story holds the family together.

The author gives her characters permission to recount their own convict beginnings, the details of each adding depth to their actions and relationships so significant to the plot lines that gradually unfold.

One masterful sub-plot explains the background to the death of James Tedder, Catherine’s first husband. We family researchers have only ever had the cold hard fact of his passing as gleaned from the records. Now we can read how it may have all come about, the writing in of some introduced and rather unsavoury characters making it all so believable.

In Van Diemen’s Land, the setting is not only early Hobart but its upriver outcentre, New Norfolk, where the ageing James Cullen is endeavouring to finish building his stately mansion for his beloved Elizabeth.

Being a novel about a family the children are naturally painted large. We really get to know the three young sons of Sarah Blay who closes down her life in Spitalfields to embark on HMS Kangaroo and follow her convict husband to the other side of the world. Her boys, we feel sure will loom large as the story proceeds, and their own personalities are artfully drawn in ways that captivate the reader.

No Room for Regret is a book for all interested in our early history to read and enjoy, whether Cullen descendants or not. It was launched on 28 April 2018 in the very mansion that features so much in its pages, Glen Derwent, at New Norfolk.

[Note: Your reviewer is also a descendant of FF James B Cullen through the latter’s third daughter, Betsy, so his task to read and review was very pleasant indeed. The book is available in bookstores in Victoria and Tasmania and can also be obtained as an eBook from Amazon.com.au]

The author is a member of the First Fleet Fellowship Victoria.]

(Jon Fearon)

No Room for Regret is the interwoven story of four convicts who were transported from England to New South Wales between 1788 and 1812. James Bryan Cullen, transported on the Scarborough with the First Fleet in 1788, Elizabeth Bartlett transported on the Marquis Cornwallis in 1796, James Tedder and James Blay transported in 1812 to Van Diemen’s Land on the ship Indefatigable.

Their stories speak of the horrors, inhumanity, and terrible deprivation they suffered on their dangerous journey across the world from England to the new colony.

The remarkable transformation of their lives in Van Diemen’s Land from convicts to free settlers, respectable members of the community who owned land and property and who, with their families forged a life which they could never have achieved in England, is utterly amazing.

Included in this novel is the story of Sarah Blay, James Blay’s wife. Sarah’s courageous determination to follow her convict husband to VDL 12 months after he was transported – having to pay for herself and their 3 young sons – was incredible.

Sarah and her three boys embarked on HMS Kangaroo venturing forth on a perilous journey to unknown VDL, a journey which would last fourteen months at sea and on land. Sarah’s is a story of remarkable courage and unbreakable spirit and a determination to overcome situations against almost unassailable odds. No room for regret is an excellent story which will keep the reader enthralled until the end.

(Denise Wood)

I just loved it. 5 STARS. Great characters, very exciting and believable story. Your descriptions made me feel like I was there with the families. I also liked the facts/info at the start/end of each chapter. The outcomes for the people was surprising! The whole story flowed beautifully. Well done! I will wait patiently for the next instalment.
(Susan Cook)

Hello Janeen,
Finished your book at 8:30 AM this morning. I am no literary critic, however, I found the story kept me fully engaged throughout. That’s saying something as I have been researching several of my 9 convicts forebears since 1998. Long before Ancestry arrived and many records went online.

My skin crawled when Toothless appeared and I wished for a suitably ghoulish demise for him – not Teddy! I fell in love with James Bryan Cullen – (he reminded me of my James Jordan – one of my heroes) – and I loved your portrayal of the stoic endurance of the Norfolk Island convicts.

(Nancy)

Janeen, I’ve just finished reading your book after putting it aside until I’d completed FAW. (Families at War unit in the Diploma of Family History.) Congratulations on a wonderful story! You have really brought your family story to life, and in giving your characters a voice and personality you have ensured that their story is not forgotten. Thank you!

(Katrina Vincent)

I really enjoyed the book. It was great. I was cut when the scumbag ******* murdered *****though.

(Warren Werrett)

I thoroughly enjoyed the story in your book Janeen. Having visited Port Arthur, Norfolk Island and England’s dock where the first fleet sailed from, it ignited my imagination. The personalities and vision of each of the characters came to life, as did the locations of everything that occurred. I also appreciated that the story moved along nicely, drawing this reader into each phase, keen to know what was going to occur next. Well done! Or should I say “written”.

(Karen Pickering)

Hi Janeen

I finished your book; I loved it. I thought it was a wonderfully written and powerful account of your ancestor’s lives. I found that I was able to visualise with your description of the environments that the characters were in, all the time. That, for me, is key. If I can imagine where they were and what they were going through, the book has me. It was highly enjoyable and kept me very engaged right to the end.

Thank you again for allowing me the privilege of reading your novel. I cannot wait for the next one.

(Julie-Anne)

I feel like I’ve made new friends, been on a ship, been forced to the other side of the world and much much more!!

I love the characters, love how it moves between their stories and is written so eloquently. I especially love the smells!!!

If I had more time on my hands I would’ve finished it in one weekend.. it’s amazing!!

Explains so much about the English/ Irish culture and stratification of society at that time too and feels so authentic that it leads organically into an explanation of the formulation of Australian culture.

The touches of history, distances, images, newspaper cuttings really bring the story to life and make you invest even more.

(Ashleigh Hutton)

“I just finished reading your masterpiece. I thought it was so well written, I cried and laughed with the characters. I hated **** and was sure **** would be saved. I was on the edge of my seat as he made his way to the *******. A really great read, and would make an excellent movie”.

(Patricia)

Firstly, thank you for trusting me with reading your first novel; I’m honoured.The general flow of the story was well structured – the initial imprisoning of Blay and Tedder in England, to their transportation to Van Diemen’s Land and then their assignment when they got to Australia.

The story of Blay’s family making the journey to Australia was enthralling and really made you feel the emotion of the journey.

It was very easy to read the story, in fact, at times I had trouble putting it down.

(Luke)

When I finished reading No Room for Regret, I felt grateful but wanted revenge for the characters. I lived right next to them throughout their journeys and wanted to reach out to them to give them to give hope. I relished in their glimmer of happy grateful times, but felt the burden of their hardship on my shoulders. I got to know them well. The author has presented a book extremely well written but so easy to read. I want the next chapter to right the wrongs to know all is well. The author makes no apologies on the explicit descriptions of their unjust treatment. I look forward to the next book to transport me back in history and back into the lives that brought me to this day. Well worth the read.

(Debbie)

Janeen I have just finished reading ‘No Room For Regret.’ I couldn’t put the book down. I felt their pain and relished in their victories. When will the next book be released? I cannot wait to read how the next part of their lives go.
Thank you so much for writing this book.

Much love.

(Ally) xxx

The book was certainly an enjoyable read and the story line was well-plotted and flowed well. I liked the way Janeen focused on a later time frame in Tasmania and brought her First Fleeter in as an ‘example’ or role model for his convict employee and convict son-in-law to follow, although I wasn’t so keen on the continuing convict stereotype of the chains and the lash. Well done, Janeen.

(Louise)

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1 thought on “No Room for Regret – Reviews

  1. This review is from my cousin, Debbie. So the characters in the novel are her family, too. It was very rewarding to read what she had to say, she tells it like it is, so I know she means this. Happy dance. 🙂

    When I finished reading No Room for Regret, I felt grateful but wanted revenge for the characters. I lived right next to them throughout their journeys and wanted to reach out to them to give them to give hope. I relished in their glimmer of happy grateful times, but felt the burden of their hardship on my shoulders. I got to know them well. The author has presented a book extremely well written but so easy to read. I want the next chapter to right the wrongs to know all is well. The author makes no apologies on the explicit descriptions of their unjust treatment. I look forward to the next book to transport me back in history and back into the lives that brought me to this day. Well worth the read.
    Debbie

    Like

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